UX Design: Celebrating the User

When Software Says Thanks

     A great deal has been said about playfulness in design. Playfulness is takes advantage of a potentially boring interaction, and it adds a touch of humor to delight the user. I would say this is the human equivalent of flirting with the user. While flirting is key in the beginning of a relationship, there comes a time where you have to show the user how you really feel. Celebrating the user is a way to take the next step to really show your user that you appreciate them. Social networks rely on their users to create the content that fuels their site, and I think we can take a cue from them when it comes to celebrating the user. While not every company can actually pay their user like YouTube does with its Partner Program, companies like Tumblr do an excellent job of showing their users love through UX design. What are some ways to celebrate your user? Here are a few examples of companies celebrating their users...

Probably the best example I've come across of celebrating the user. Where most companies would have just placed a generic "Thanks for Posting" notification, Tumblr goes above and beyond.

Probably the best example I've come across of celebrating the user. Where most companies would have just placed a generic "Thanks for Posting" notification, Tumblr goes above and beyond.

Facebook uses video posts from its own account to celebrate the idea of the user. This ad integrates into the timeline so it feels like part of the UI.

Facebook uses video posts from its own account to celebrate the idea of the user. This ad integrates into the timeline so it feels like part of the UI.

Sometimes just reminding a user of a reward is enough to celebrate them. After a new benchmark is reached on Team Treehouse, a congratulatory message alerts you to the new points you've received with some fun animation.

Sometimes just reminding a user of a reward is enough to celebrate them. After a new benchmark is reached on Team Treehouse, a congratulatory message alerts you to the new points you've received with some fun animation.

Today's Work Jam 7/27

Berlin-based, DEADBEAR, aka Nick Donovan. Focus-single "Tongues" Donovan blends shards of incomprehensible vocals with layers of drums, glockenspiels and electronica found sounds alongside the vocals of Japanese collaborator Qrion - famed for her work with Ryan Hemsworth and her own unique productions.


UX Flow: 4 Ways to Walk a New User Through Your App

The "Walkthrough" Approach

This is the most common method used by companies like Google and Squarespace. It walks users through the flow using popovers and intro screens to help you through their UX flow. This approach is the most similar to having a professional on hand to help you with onboarding. To ensure that the popovers aren't too cumbersome, they should be easily dismissed (See my earlier blog post on Popovers).

 

The "Do Something" Approach

Used by apps like Tumblr and Ness, this approach is great because it gets the user to create content almost immediately. Tumblr considers its UI to be so intuitive that it doesn't need a walk through. If your app is simple enough, this can be a great way to get your user addicted to using your app.

 

The "Setup" Approach

The simplified approach helps the user through creating his account then you're on your own. This is another good approach for apps with a very simple UI because it doesn't overwhelm the user with options. Companies like Apple and FitBit do this to help personalize their software for your needs.

UXflows_GifGraphic_Fitbit1.gif

 

The "All In" approach

This approach walks the user through the set-up process and prompts them to post something. Pinterest uses this approach to get users to sign-in and post a Pin in one approach.